Is the Canada Child Benefit an effective policy? Impacts on earnings and incomes

In 2016, the government of Canada introduced the Canada Child Benefit (CCB), a large income-tested transfer to families with children. Our research shows it works well for low-income Canadians but causes a significant decrease in hours worked by secondary earners in middle-income families. We argue the CCB could be better-targeted toward low-income households. Read this articleIs the Canada Child Benefit an effective policy? Impacts on earnings and incomes

Increased immigration cannot solve Canada’s aging issues because immigrants have parents, too

Immigrants wave Canadian flags

That fact that the phrase “immigrants have parents” needs to be said reveals something about the framing of Canadian immigration policy: the tendency to see immigrants as production units, bits of human capital to slot into the Canadian economy and to fill Canadian skill shortages or to provide top talent. Read this articleIncreased immigration cannot solve Canada’s aging issues because immigrants have parents, too

The Liberals’ plan for first-time homeowners is a good start but should be more equitable

Housing

The FHSA would cost up to $1.4 billion annually, but much of the benefit would likely go to high-income households. Changes to the proposed program would make it more fair and more likely to encourage private savings by prospective first-time homebuyers. Read this articleThe Liberals’ plan for first-time homeowners is a good start but should be more equitable

Canada should harmonize tax credits to enhance fairness and efficiency

using a calculator for taxes

Our proposal represents an incremental step in the direction of a basic income guarantee. Harmonizing the main income tax credits, making the base and tax-back rate suitably progressive, and ensuring they are all refundable would form the basis for a modest basic income. Read this articleCanada should harmonize tax credits to enhance fairness and efficiency